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Oscar Nominations Wrap-Up

Buzz Blog - April 20, 2021 - 4:40pm

When the Oscar nominations were announced, my biggest takeaways were the diversity of the nominations. Two females were nominated for Best Director, with Chloé Zhao being the first woman of color nominated as director. So, now we’re up to only seven females ever nominated for director.  Progress, but not much.

Concerning progress, or lack of it, what about Regina King for her marvelous directing of One Night in Miami, a film that got close to being shut out of the major categories, with the exception of Adapted Screenplay and Leslie Odom Jr. getting nominated for Best Supporting Actor. King’s direction in One Night in Miami is stellar and definitely one of the best things about the film. The way she highlights each of the four actors in their own way while keeping an eye on the overall storytelling is unexcelled. But, yet, the Academy chose to nominate the director for the Danish film, Another Round, Thomas Vinterberg, in her place, or in what should have been her place. Another Round deserves its Best International Film nomination but not nominating King as Best Director is a major oversight. One Night in Miami was also left off the Best Picture list of nominations as well.

Speaking of snubs, let’s talk about Da 5 Bloods also being shut out.  NO major nominations.  Only Best Original Score. This is one of my top films of the year. I feel this is Spike Lee’s tour-de-force, one of the best films he’s directed in his long career. Like One Night in Miami, Da 5 Bloods is a stunning piece of ensemble acting that is carefully and meticulously filmed in the hands of expert Lee. Each of the major characters evolves slowly, unraveling their individual stories in collaboration of the story as a whole. It’s a masterpiece in filmmaking, yet the Academy didn’t deem it worthy of any major nominations.

Let’s move onto The Mauritanian, a powerful movie featuring a great performance by Jodie Foster. She won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress but was snubbed for the Oscar. Why? Well, in the Best Supporting Actress Oscar category, Glenn Close’s nomination for Hillbilly Elegy could have been the slot for Jodie Foster. Close’s performance is by far the best thing in the Hillbilly Elegy. But, the film is a highly flawed, mediocre, troubled adaptation of a great book. The Mauritanian is a strong film with an excellent performance by Foster. Was she robbed for Close being rewarded? Did the Academy decide to honor Close, a seven-time Oscar nominee (now eight) but never a winner in lieu of two-time Oscar winner Foster?  Maybe…!  Another phenomenal performance in The Mauritanian is Tahar Rahim, a French actor of Algerian descent who steals the show (sometimes even from Foster!) as a Mohamedou Ould Slahi, the real-life Mauritanian held in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp for 14 years without being charged with a crime. Both performances on their own would make this movie a must-see. The fact that it’s also a taut, well-paced legal drama makes it a very strong film indeed!

So, let’s focus on what the nominations did include. I already mentioned the two female Best Director nominations, Chloe Zhao for Nomadland and Emerald Fennell for Promising Young Woman. Fennell is the first female director ever nominated for a debut film. Also in the Director category is Minari’s Lee Issac Chung, who is of Korean descent.

The Best Actor category is even more diverse. Riz Ahmed from The Sound of Metal is only the second actor nominated of Indian descent (the first being Ben Kingsley for Gandhi). Minari’s Steven Yeun is the first Asian American nominated for Best Actor. And, of course, there’s Chadwick Boseman’s posthumous nomination for Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. In the Best Supporting Actor category, three of the five nominees are Black: Daniel Kaluuya and LaKeith Stanfield for Judas and the Black Messiah and Leslie Odom Jr. for One Night in Miami. 

In the Best Actress category, Viola Davis for Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and Andra Day for The United States vs. Billie Holiday are both African American. And in the Best Supporting Actress category, only South Korean Yuh-Jung Youn from Minari brings any diversity of color.

What does all of this mean? It means the Academy has made progress. But, not enough! Want more? Join me, Cecilia, as I review the best and the worst of Hollywood in the very strange year of 2020.

The Oscars telecast is scheduled for Sunday, April 25, at 7pm.

 

The post Oscar Nominations Wrap-Up appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Get Started with the Silhouette Cameo

Technology Blog - March 10, 2021 - 5:51pm

Looking to get your craft on? Look no further than the Silhouette Cameo! The software and machine help you create your own designs, using images, different fonts, shapes, and your imagination! The Cameo machine cuts a wide range of materials like fabric and adhesive or heat transfer vinyl. With super, easy to use cut settings and a touchscreen on the machine, your delightful designs are cut to precision every time!  

Whether it’s creating a design for a mug, t-shirt, wooden sign, mailbox, popcorn bowl, or really any surface that isn’t water, the Silhouette Cameo has you covered! Using the Silhouette Studio software and Cameo cutter, you’ll design and print your project on vinyl. And spoiler alert, the vinyl comes in so many fun colors and patterns, that you could spend days trying to decide which one to use!

To start designing, simply download the free Silhouette Studio Software from the Silhouette website. You are able to design from the comfort of your own home on either a Mac or a Windows computer. Better yet, once the software is downloaded, you do not need internet connection to enjoy the program. Once you have the software downloaded, I would recommend taking a gander at the Silhouette Handbook, which will give you a complete tour of everything you’d ever want to know about the Silhouette.   

The software is very easy to use and built to accommodate beginners to advanced crafters. There are so many fun tools to use and master, you’ll likely spend hours having fun playing around with all the features! Get creative with customizing different elements of your design and projects! You have the option to use designs from the Silhouette library, create your own design by drawing it, or trace an image you find elsewhere. There’s also an online Silhouette Store, where you can purchase a design and customize it to your heart’s content.  

The Niles-Maine District Library has a Silhouette Cameo Cutting Machine in our Makerspace that you can use! If you’re a NMDL cardholder, you can make an appointment to use the space by calling 847-663-6606, and if you are a reciprocal borrower, you can walk-in (please note the Makerspace and the equipment is based on availability and is subject to change). 

We can’t wait to see what you design and create! If you’re looking for a summertime project (it’s almost that time!), why not design your very own Summer Drink Koozie with Alexa from the Digital Services Department. 

The post Get Started with the Silhouette Cameo appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Get Started with the Silhouette Cameo

Buzz Blog - March 10, 2021 - 5:51pm

Looking to get your craft on? Look no further than the Silhouette Cameo! The software and machine help you create your own designs, using images, different fonts, shapes, and your imagination! The Cameo machine cuts a wide range of materials like fabric and adhesive or heat transfer vinyl. With super, easy to use cut settings and a touchscreen on the machine, your delightful designs are cut to precision every time!  

Whether it’s creating a design for a mug, t-shirt, wooden sign, mailbox, popcorn bowl, or really any surface that isn’t water, the Silhouette Cameo has you covered! Using the Silhouette Studio software and Cameo cutter, you’ll design and print your project on vinyl. And spoiler alert, the vinyl comes in so many fun colors and patterns, that you could spend days trying to decide which one to use!

To start designing, simply download the free Silhouette Studio Software from the Silhouette website. You are able to design from the comfort of your own home on either a Mac or a Windows computer. Better yet, once the software is downloaded, you do not need internet connection to enjoy the program. Once you have the software downloaded, I would recommend taking a gander at the Silhouette Handbook, which will give you a complete tour of everything you’d ever want to know about the Silhouette.   

The software is very easy to use and built to accommodate beginners to advanced crafters. There are so many fun tools to use and master, you’ll likely spend hours having fun playing around with all the features! Get creative with customizing different elements of your design and projects! You have the option to use designs from the Silhouette library, create your own design by drawing it, or trace an image you find elsewhere. There’s also an online Silhouette Store, where you can purchase a design and customize it to your heart’s content.  

The Niles-Maine District Library has a Silhouette Cameo Cutting Machine in our Makerspace that you can use! If you’re a NMDL cardholder, you can make an appointment to use the space by calling 847-663-6606, and if you are a reciprocal borrower, you can walk-in (please note the Makerspace and the equipment is based on availability and is subject to change). 

We can’t wait to see what you design and create! If you’re looking for a summertime project (it’s almost that time!), why not design your very own Summer Drink Koozie with Alexa from the Digital Services Department. 

The post Get Started with the Silhouette Cameo appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Books We Love: Ready Player Two

Buzz Blog - February 26, 2021 - 9:23pm

Unlike my eating habits, I’m not a picky reader. I love all genres, storylines, and interesting settings. While I do read in mass quantity, I’m always looking for that quality story that sticks with me long after the final sentence. 

I’ve read some truly amazing books in the last year, but one of my new all-time favorites has been Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. Since I first read it in 2017, I have reread it 8 other times and listened to the audiobook, narrated by none other than the fantastic Wil Wheaton, 3 times. 

Folks, I love this book. 

The story has everything I want when I crack open a spine. Characters you feel like jump off the page and burrow themselves into your very essence, a fast-paced plot line that gives you paper cuts because you can’t turn the page fast enough, consequences and never easy challenges to overcome (although they always end up being triumphant, just in surprising ways), and the nostalgia of the 80s. 

If you’re not familiar with the story, here’s a summary from Goodreads: 

In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. 

But when Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

The story is so good, they even made it into a movie. And yes I am one of those snobs who will ALWAYS say the book is better than the movie (unless Keanu Reeves is playing the hero), and Ready Player One is no exception. The movie changed a lot of the really great details and storylines of the book, even though it came to the same ending. Do I understand why Hollywood made the changes? Yes. Did I like the changes? Ummmmm, no. BUT! After being sorely disappointed after the first viewing, I did watch it again and could appreciate the liberties they took with the plot, even if silently in my head I was matching all the inaccuracies on the screen to what was written in my beloved pages. 

Enough about the movie because it wasn’t amazing, but the book! THE BOOK is seriously, close to near-perfect. And the best part is, the sequel is coming out in November! 

Ready Player Two is a continuation of the first story. Thanks again to Goodreads for the summary:  

An unexpected quest. Two worlds at stake. Are you ready?

Days after Oasis founder James Halliday’s contest, Wade Watts makes a discovery that changes everything. Hidden within Halliday’s vault, waiting for his heir to find, lies a technological advancement that will once again change the world and make the Oasis a thousand times more wondrous, and addictive, than even Wade dreamed possible. With it comes a new riddle and a new quest. A last Easter egg from Halliday, hinting at a mysterious prize. And an unexpected, impossibly powerful, and dangerous new rival awaits, one who will kill millions to get what he wants. Wade’s life and the future of the Oasis are again at stake, but this time the fate of humanity also hangs in the balance.

You best believe I’ve preordered my copy of Ready Player Two and will be incommunicado the second it arrives. There’s no shame in finding stories that resonate with you and being unable to contain your excitement. Call it an obsession. Call it being part of the fandom. Whatever its label, I’m grateful for stories that make me feel seen and less alone in the world, even if they take place in the virtual world with impossible obstacles. 

 

Sources

 

The post Books We Love: Ready Player Two appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Teen Zainab Reviews Mystery Themed Yay! YA Book Box and Loves It!

Buzz Blog: Teens - February 11, 2021 - 5:25pm

Summary
Books should be eye catching, captivating, and action packed all at once, right? Well, the book ​Ten ​by Gretchen McNeil​ ​meets all of those expectations. ​Ten ​is a mystery novel in which each word you read will leave you desperate to read on. The book starts off as Meg and Minnie are invited to a party on an island. They are a bit skeptical about going at first, but they get over it when they learn that the party is hosted by a popular girl. Eight other people are also invited. When the two girls arrive at the party, Minne makes new friends. Meg, however, seems to be the odd duckling. Minnie forgets about her.

The party gets stranger and stranger. One of the members is found dead. Then another is found, and another. Some fingers start pointing to the party’s host since she arranged it. Others are just terrified, and they want to run away out of fear. But they cannot until the party ends. The party lasts for three days. Eventually, they do end up finding out who the murderer was. But the killer had an unfortunate history of why they were killing people. So who could it have been? You will have to read to find out!

Who Should Read This Book?
I recommend this book to teens who like horror stories, mystery, and people the ages of 12 and up. Since this book has some violence involved, I do not think anybody who gets anxious about horror related things should be reading this book. For me personally, I thought it was pretty gruesome.

Yay YA! Book Box Contents Review
Not only were the books in the box enjoyable, but the extra goodies were great as well! I especially loved playing the games. I played the Mad Libs with my whole family. We all got a good laugh out of it. Also, I really liked the stickers that said “CONFIDENTIAL” on them. I put one of those stickers on my diary. Overall, I had a blast with the contents in the book box. Thank you!

By: Zainab N.

The post Teen Zainab Reviews Mystery Themed Yay! YA Book Box and Loves It! appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Teen Zainab Reviews Mystery Themed Yay! YA Book Box and Loves It!

Buzz Blog - February 11, 2021 - 5:25pm

Summary
Books should be eye catching, captivating, and action packed all at once, right? Well, the book ​Ten ​by Gretchen McNeil​ ​meets all of those expectations. ​Ten ​is a mystery novel in which each word you read will leave you desperate to read on. The book starts off as Meg and Minnie are invited to a party on an island. They are a bit skeptical about going at first, but they get over it when they learn that the party is hosted by a popular girl. Eight other people are also invited. When the two girls arrive at the party, Minne makes new friends. Meg, however, seems to be the odd duckling. Minnie forgets about her.

The party gets stranger and stranger. One of the members is found dead. Then another is found, and another. Some fingers start pointing to the party’s host since she arranged it. Others are just terrified, and they want to run away out of fear. But they cannot until the party ends. The party lasts for three days. Eventually, they do end up finding out who the murderer was. But the killer had an unfortunate history of why they were killing people. So who could it have been? You will have to read to find out!

Who Should Read This Book?
I recommend this book to teens who like horror stories, mystery, and people the ages of 12 and up. Since this book has some violence involved, I do not think anybody who gets anxious about horror related things should be reading this book. For me personally, I thought it was pretty gruesome.

Yay YA! Book Box Contents Review
Not only were the books in the box enjoyable, but the extra goodies were great as well! I especially loved playing the games. I played the Mad Libs with my whole family. We all got a good laugh out of it. Also, I really liked the stickers that said “CONFIDENTIAL” on them. I put one of those stickers on my diary. Overall, I had a blast with the contents in the book box. Thank you!

By: Zainab N.

The post Teen Zainab Reviews Mystery Themed Yay! YA Book Box and Loves It! appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Looking Back at the Last Year: Staff Picks from 2020

Buzz Blog - January 29, 2021 - 7:10pm

We all know 2020 will go down in history for being one of the strangest years ever. For me, as a public librarian, not physically interacting with the public but rather helping patrons remotely definitely qualifies as strange, as does hosting programs, attending meetings and watching presentations all via Zoom rather than in person. One good thing that came out of last year is that after a day of typing and Zooming, the last thing I wanted to do was look at another screen…so I read. I finished more books in 2020 than I ever have and occasionally found time to also catch up on some movies and series. I wanted to find out if my Niles-Maine colleagues felt the same. 

So, I asked my co-workers to let me know what their favorite watches and reads were from last year.  And since I got such great responses, I’ve divided our picks into three lists: Series, Movies, and Books. For the Series and Movies lists, I have included titles that were streamed on a variety of different platforms we do not have access to at the library (except on our Rokus in Digital Services). And hopefully (fingers crossed!) some of the streaming titles will eventually come on DVD or migrate to hoopla or Kanopy where we can watch them from the library’s collection. I found the variety of our choices fascinating and thought you might find it fascinating too. 

Considering that Hollywood and the publishing world were as affected as everywhere else by the Pandemic, it’s amazing that there are so many great titles on these lists. I hope you enjoy finding out what were our favorites of 2020!  And here’s hoping 2021 provides as much rich entertainment, but more importantly, less isolation and fear and eventually, more togetherness.

The post Looking Back at the Last Year: Staff Picks from 2020 appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

2021 Youth Media Award Winners

Buzz Blog: Teens - January 25, 2021 - 9:09pm

The anticipation is over and we’re so excited to announce the winners of the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards 2021! Every year, the ALA honors authors and creators of various media outlets for children and teens. These awards are not only given as a way to celebrate the creativity and originality of the creators, they’re also a way for librarians, educators, and parents to know what quality media is available for their patrons, students, and children.

To check the availability of these titles or to place a hold on a title, please click on the links below.

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature: When You Trap a Tiger written by Tae Keller.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children: We Are Water Protectors illustrated by Michaela Goade and written by Carole Lindstrom.

Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults: Everything Sad Is Untrue (a true story) written by Daniel Nayeri

For a full and complete list of all award winners, visit the American Libraries Website here

The post 2021 Youth Media Award Winners appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

2021 Youth Media Award Winners

Buzz Blog - January 25, 2021 - 9:09pm

The anticipation is over and we’re so excited to announce the winners of the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards 2021! Every year, the ALA honors authors and creators of various media outlets for children and teens. These awards are not only given as a way to celebrate the creativity and originality of the creators, they’re also a way for librarians, educators, and parents to know what quality media is available for their patrons, students, and children.

To check the availability of these titles or to place a hold on a title, please click on the links below.

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature: When You Trap a Tiger written by Tae Keller.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children: We Are Water Protectors illustrated by Michaela Goade and written by Carole Lindstrom.

Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults: Everything Sad Is Untrue (a true story) written by Daniel Nayeri

For a full and complete list of all award winners, visit the American Libraries Website here

The post 2021 Youth Media Award Winners appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

2021 Youth Media Award Winners

Buzz Blog: KidSpace - January 25, 2021 - 9:09pm

The anticipation is over and we’re so excited to announce the winners of the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards 2021! Every year, the ALA honors authors and creators of various media outlets for children and teens. These awards are not only given as a way to celebrate the creativity and originality of the creators, they’re also a way for librarians, educators, and parents to know what quality media is available for their patrons, students, and children.

To check the availability of these titles or to place a hold on a title, please click on the links below.

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature: When You Trap a Tiger written by Tae Keller.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children: We Are Water Protectors illustrated by Michaela Goade and written by Carole Lindstrom.

Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults: Everything Sad Is Untrue (a true story) written by Daniel Nayeri

For a full and complete list of all award winners, visit the American Libraries Website here

The post 2021 Youth Media Award Winners appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

How To Manage Stress: Tips From a Teen

Buzz Blog: Teens - January 22, 2021 - 1:01pm

Stress. Amidst this whole pandemic, this word has been all over our minds. Chronic stress can lead to many mental and physical health problems such as depression and heart disease. This stress can be what is keeping you up at night, and affecting your well being. You are not alone. If you are a teenager, stress is the number one health concern among high schoolers. 73% of people have stress that is impactful on their mental health. Some signs of stress are irritability, hopelessness, self-neglect, and personality change. Stress is healthy and everyone experiences it at some point in their life, if not every day. You just need to learn how to cope with it. Here are some tips on alleviating that stress you’ve got hanging over your head.

1. Meditation

Meditation is a great way to manage stress. Just a couple of minutes of intentional breathing can have a great impact on your day, whether that’s at home, school, or work. Meditation helps you prioritize, and eliminate stress. There are many online programs, videos, and apps to choose from. Meditation is a great way to start and end your day.

 

 

2. Exercise

Exercise is a great way to eliminate stress. When you exercise, endorphins are released. Endorphins are those “feel good” chemicals in your body. They give you a happiness booster. You should try to get in 30 minutes of exercise per day. That does not have to be lifting 100 lbs weights or doing HITT programs. It could be walking your dog in the park or going for a jog around the neighborhood. These little things can help you reduce stress.

 

3. Journaling

Journaling is an amazing way to diminish stress. Just writing down how you feel can be very helpful. Journaling can help you set and achieve goals that may be causing you stress. It gives you an opportunity to self-reflect on things in life. Journaling is great for all people, and is an amazing way to deal with stress.

 

4. Music

Listening to music can be a great solution for managing your stress. When you listen to music you release the hormone dopamine, which is another one of those “feel-good” hormones. When you listen to music with someone else, another hormone called prolactin is released. Prolactin is the hormone that bonds people together. Listening to music can do great things to your body, which can allow you to just relax. Music is an exceptional form of diminishing stress and anxiety.

 

5. Talking to friends, family, or a therapist

Talking to another person can be great to alleviate stress. It does not have to be a therapist; it could be your friends or family members. Even your dog. Talking to someone about your problems can help you forget about your stress, and the person you are talking to can help you fix it. Therapy is a great way to alleviate chronic stress. A therapist can help you find ways to manage all that stress. Talking to someone is a great way to alleviate stress.

Resources:

NAMI: Teens & Young Adults

The Recovery Village: Stress Facts and Statistics 

WebMD: Stress Symptoms

-Rayhan K

The post How To Manage Stress: Tips From a Teen appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

How To Manage Stress: Tips From a Teen

Buzz Blog - January 22, 2021 - 1:01pm

Stress. Amidst this whole pandemic, this word has been all over our minds. Chronic stress can lead to many mental and physical health problems such as depression and heart disease. This stress can be what is keeping you up at night, and affecting your well being. You are not alone. If you are a teenager, stress is the number one health concern among high schoolers. 73% of people have stress that is impactful on their mental health. Some signs of stress are irritability, hopelessness, self-neglect, and personality change. Stress is healthy and everyone experiences it at some point in their life, if not every day. You just need to learn how to cope with it. Here are some tips on alleviating that stress you’ve got hanging over your head.

1. Meditation

Meditation is a great way to manage stress. Just a couple of minutes of intentional breathing can have a great impact on your day, whether that’s at home, school, or work. Meditation helps you prioritize, and eliminate stress. There are many online programs, videos, and apps to choose from. Meditation is a great way to start and end your day.

 

 

2. Exercise

Exercise is a great way to eliminate stress. When you exercise, endorphins are released. Endorphins are those “feel good” chemicals in your body. They give you a happiness booster. You should try to get in 30 minutes of exercise per day. That does not have to be lifting 100 lbs weights or doing HITT programs. It could be walking your dog in the park or going for a jog around the neighborhood. These little things can help you reduce stress.

 

3. Journaling

Journaling is an amazing way to diminish stress. Just writing down how you feel can be very helpful. Journaling can help you set and achieve goals that may be causing you stress. It gives you an opportunity to self-reflect on things in life. Journaling is great for all people, and is an amazing way to deal with stress.

 

4. Music

Listening to music can be a great solution for managing your stress. When you listen to music you release the hormone dopamine, which is another one of those “feel-good” hormones. When you listen to music with someone else, another hormone called prolactin is released. Prolactin is the hormone that bonds people together. Listening to music can do great things to your body, which can allow you to just relax. Music is an exceptional form of diminishing stress and anxiety.

 

5. Talking to friends, family, or a therapist

Talking to another person can be great to alleviate stress. It does not have to be a therapist; it could be your friends or family members. Even your dog. Talking to someone about your problems can help you forget about your stress, and the person you are talking to can help you fix it. Therapy is a great way to alleviate chronic stress. A therapist can help you find ways to manage all that stress. Talking to someone is a great way to alleviate stress.

Resources:

NAMI: Teens & Young Adults

The Recovery Village: Stress Facts and Statistics 

WebMD: Stress Symptoms

-Rayhan K

The post How To Manage Stress: Tips From a Teen appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Q&A with Newbery Committee Member

Buzz Blog - January 19, 2021 - 10:43am

Exciting things are happening in the literary world. Ahead of the announcement of the winners of the Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book awards at the Youth Media Awards on Monday, January 25 at 8 a.m. CT, we talked with one of the Newbery Committee members who is actually our Executive Director, Susan Dove Lempke.

Library: What is the John Newbery Medal?

Susan: The Newbery Medal award is presented by the Association for Library Service to Children that is given to the writer of the “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children”. This year will be the 100th Newbery Award!

Library: How long have you been a member of the Newbery Committee?

Susan: The Newbery Committee appointment is for one year, and there are 15 members. My committee read the books published for children in 2020.

Library: As part of the Newbery Committee, how many books do you have to read?

Susan: You read roughly a book a day for a year, but some books take longer and as you get closer to deciding, you also have to do some re-reading.

Library: What was the most difficult part about choosing a winner this year?

Susan: The hardest part was the pandemic. That made it hard to focus on reading for a while, and also the publishers started sending some of the books electronically instead of in print. It was really a challenge to keep track of where to find a particular book (Is it on my Kindle? Did I put it in Dropbox? Is it on another platform?) and also I discovered at one point that when my Dropbox got full that it started deleting things. So trying to do that while also having to make lots and lots of decisions about running the library during a pandemic was not the easiest.

Library: What are you most excited about the Youth Media Awards this year?

Susan: I’m excited to watch the YMAs with my committee via Zoom—we’ll get to see what all of the other committees picked, and then the Newbery comes last. And then I will be very excited to see this year’s Newbery added to our collection!

To follow the results, you can visit the American Library Association’s streaming platform or ALA’s social media at Facebook, YouTube, or Twitter by following the hashtag #alayma.

The post Q&A with Newbery Committee Member appeared first on Library Buzz Blog.

Q&A with Newbery Committee Member

Buzz Blog: KidSpace - January 19, 2021 - 10:43am

Exciting things are happening in the literary world. Ahead of the announcement of the winners of the Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book awards at the Youth Media Awards on Monday, January 25 at 8 a.m. CT, we talked with one of the Newbery Committee members who is actually our Executive Director, Susan Dove Lempke.

Library: What is the John Newbery Medal?

Susan: The Newbery Medal award is presented by the Association for Library Service to Children that is given to the writer of the “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children”. This year will be the 100th Newbery Award!

Library: How long have you been a member of the Newbery Committee?

Susan: The Newbery Committee appointment is for one year, and there are 15 members. My committee read the books published for children in 2020.

Library: As part of the Newbery Committee, how many books do you have to read?

Susan: You read roughly a book a day for a year, but some books take longer and as you get closer to deciding, you also have to do some re-reading.

Library: What was the most difficult part about choosing a winner this year?

Susan: The hardest part was the pandemic. That made it hard to focus on reading for a while, and also the publishers started sending some of the books electronically instead of in print. It was really a challenge to keep track of where to find a particular book (Is it on my Kindle? Did I put it in Dropbox? Is it on another platform?) and also I discovered at one point that when my Dropbox got full that it started deleting things. So trying to do that while also having to make lots and lots of decisions about running the library during a pandemic was not the easiest.

Library: What are you most excited about the Youth Media Awards this year?

Susan: I’m excited to watch the YMAs with my committee via Zoom—we’ll get to see what all of the other committees picked, and then the Newbery comes last. And then I will be very excited to see this year’s Newbery added to our collection!

To follow the results, you can visit the American Library Association’s streaming platform or ALA’s social media at Facebook, YouTube, or Twitter by following the hashtag #alayma.

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